Propaganda from Memorial’s Faculty of Medicine

 

Recently there was an article published on the blog of the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) from Memorial University’s Faculty of Medicine. I think the article was less than open and it lacked balance in its propaganda about the situation there.

See –

50 years of education and research at MUN’s Faculty of Medicine

 

As I made clear in my response, I was disappointed that the article seemed to select only the strengths and to ignore the weaknesses in the Faculty of Medicine.

Specifically, there was no mention of the challenges presented by the apparent weaknesses in the learning environments for anaesthesiology residents, internal medicine residents, and learners in the MD program including allegations of bullying, intimidation, harassment and sexual harassment.

There was no mention of the scepticism amongst learners and faculty about the award for alleged excellence in social accountability nor of the understanding about why an application for excellence in student engagement was aborted.

In my view it would have shown important self-awareness and organisational-awareness by the authors of the article if they had acknowledged there are weaknesses in the learning environments that need to be addressed urgently.

Declaration: I had a part-time appointment as a Clinical Assistant Professor/Visiting Professor in the Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, from the fall of 2012 to the fall of 2017. I decided not to apply to renew my appointment because of my concerns about the negative learning environments in the Faculty and the lack of meaningful responses to those concerns which I had raised with the Faculty management.

 

 

 

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About Iain Robbe

I am a medical practitioner (MB, BS, 1980; MRCS, LRCP, 1980) registered with the General Medical Council of the United Kingdom without a licence to practise. I am active as a Clinical Medical Educationist participating in a number of projects with the universities of Dalhousie in Nova Scotia and Mount Allison in New Brunswick, inter alia, and separately with three of the veterinary schools in the UK. My focus is on teaching and research in professionalism, ethics, and communications, and particularly the influences of vernacular architecture on the creation of positive learning experiences in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education. I have the degree of Master in Public Health from the University of London (1985) and the degree of Master in Medical Education with distinction from the University of Wales (2001). The guiding principles in my practices are based on andragogy and humanism, and the prime ethical principle of autonomy for the individual and in population health. December 8th 2017

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